Constipation

Constipation is more common than most people think. And there are lots of things you can do to keep food moving right through you (without sticking around for too long).

We’ve all heard to eat more prunes, right? But there are lots of things you can eat, drink, and do beyond prunes.

Constipation is the opposite of diarrhea – it’s when stool tends to stick around longer than necessary. Often, it’s drier, lumpier, and harder than normal, and may be difficult to pass.

Not sure if you have constipation or diarrhea? Click here to check out my blog post “The Scoop on Poop” to find out more.

Constipation often comes along with abdominal pain and bloating. And can be common in people with certain gut issues, like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

About 14-24% of adults experience constipation. Constipation becomes chronic when it happens at least three times per week for three months.

Constipation can be caused by diet or stress, and even changes to our daily routine. Sometimes the culprit is a medical condition or medications. And sometimes there can be a structural problem with the gut. Many times, the cause is unknown. But there are things you can do to lessen the chances of getting constipated. Like these…

 

Eat more fiber

You’ve probably heard to eat more prunes (and figs and dates) if you get constipated.

Why is that?

It comes down to fiber.

Dietary fiber is a type of plant-based carbohydrate that we can’t digest and absorb. Unlike cows, humans don’t have the digestive enzymes to break it down. And that’s a good thing!

Even though we can’t digest it ourselves, fiber is very important for our gut health for two reasons.

First, fiber helps to push things through our system (and out the other end). Ever wonder why corn comes out whole? Click here to read “Why there is corn in the toilet.”

Second, fiber is an important food for feeding the friendly microbes in our gut.

There are two kinds of fiber: soluble and insoluble.

Soluble fiber dissolves in water to make a gel-like consistency. It can soften and bulk up the stool; this is the kind of fiber that you want to focus on for helping with constipation. Soluble fiber is found in legumes (beans, peas, lentils), fruit (apples, bananas, berries, citrus, pears, etc.), vegetables (broccoli, carrots, spinach, etc.), and grains like oats.

Psyllium is a soluble non-fermenting fiber from the plant Plantago ovata. It’s been shown to help soften stools and produce a laxative effect.

Insoluble fiber, on the other hand, holds onto water and can help to push things through the gut and get things moving. It’s the kind found in the skins and seeds of fruits and vegetables like asparagus, broccoli, celery, zucchini, as well as the skins of apples, pears, and potatoes.

It’s recommended that adults consume between 20-35 grams of fiber per day.

If you are going to increase your fiber intake, make sure to do it gradually. Radically changing your diet can make things worse!

And, it’s also very important to combine increased fiber intake with drinking more fluids.

NOTE: There is conflicting evidence on how fiber affects constipation. In some cases, less insoluble fiber may be better, especially if you have certain digestive issues. So, make sure you’re monitoring how your diet affects your gut health and act accordingly. And don’t be afraid to see your natural health practitioner when necessary.

 

Drink more fluids

Since constipated stools are hard and dry, drinking more fluids can help keep everything hydrated and moist. This is especially true when trying to maintain a healthy gut every day, rather than when trying to deal with the problem of constipation after it has started.

And it doesn’t only have to be water – watery foods like soups, and some fruits and vegetables can also contribute to your fluid intake.

Always ensure you’re well hydrated, it is important for gut health as well as overall health.

 

Probiotics

Probiotics are beneficial microbes that come in fermented foods and supplements. They have a number of effects on gut health and constipation. They affect gut transit time (how fast food goes through us), increase the number of bowel movements per week, and help to soften stools to make them easier to pass.

Probiotic foods (and drinks) include fermented vegetables (like sauerkraut and kimchi), miso, kefir, and kombucha.

 

Lifestyle

Studies show that your gut benefits from regular exercise.

Ideally, aim to exercise for at least 30 minutes most days.

In terms of stress, when we’re stressed, it often affects our digestive system. The connection between our gut and our brain is so strong, researchers have coined the term “gut-brain axis.”

By better managing stress, we can help to reduce emotional and physical issues (like gut issues) that may result from stress. Try things like meditation, deep breathing, and exercise.

Louise Hay, in her book Heal Your Body, views constipation as “refusing to release old ideas and stuck in the past”. She recommends the affirmation “I allow life to flow through me”.

 

And last but not least – make sure to go when you need to go! Don’t hold it in, because that can make things worse.

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